She has them AROUND her little finger






















Katarina Radovic about her work

PERSONALS is a series of photographs about people who send pictures of themselves to specialized magazines or internet sites, pinning their hope on finding a decent partner. What they usually do is register under my favourite category, FRIENDSHIP, although they know it’s a blatant lie. Not many of them like to get straight to the point. It seems quite enough for a start to have a photograph, the right and most representative one, whether it was taken especially for the occasion or chosen in desperation among some long discarded family or holiday snaps.

My intention is to make a statement about this phenomenon of self-advertisement and about human nature as such, by showing a series of completely staged scenes, which refer to timeless aspects of life, rather than to some current issues. People in my photographs are non-professional actors who successfully perform the roles they are assigned, presenting various levels of self-awareness, a choice of views as to what is charming and attractive, and what tends to pass as COOL nowadays. There is something exciting in elevating the ordinary to the status of spectacular, in questioning and stripping off the contraceptive masks of ideology, and in performing the autopsy on human experience. In the end, they all look completely happy and proud of what they are, while their private traumas and excesses escape recognition.

Why do I photograph myself in the role of others? In the series of (self-)portraits called WOMEN, I am presenting various imaginary types of women that I find attractive, according to a somewhat twisted taste. I believe there is an element of extravagance in them that is capable of touching even the coldest person. That is what motivates me to get to love them after a while.

These fictional females reveal their FACES. Wandering through the stereotypical systems of representation, they eventually express their unique fantasies and madness. WOMEN is not just the result of exploring the possibilities of emancipation in a society marked by gender differences; they are fabrications of everyday life, ironic statements about authenticity, an endless obsession with seduction, with hiding and showing, as well as with questioning the hegemony of the visible and the experience of feminine principle. I have my mission and I wish to awaken the women’s charm, the way it is shown in my photographs. Whether it is all me or not, it seems that we live at each other’s expense. They change my life.
K.R.